Mediation
Mediation is problem solving, not counseling. Your disagreement is seen as a problem to solve, not as a fight. Mediation lets you make your own decisions. You can come up with your own personal contract on how you will care for your children now that you no longer live together. The legal term for this personal contract is “stipulation.” It can also be called a “parenting plan” or a “parenting agreement.”

What Do Mediators Do?

A mediator meets with both parents, listens to each of you, and then works with you so you can come up with a plan you can both agree is best for your child. The mediator's job is to be impartial, keep things fair, help you look at different options, help you come up with a calendar for times with the children, and support you in your efforts.

Mediation Rules

  1. Each parent is treated with respect and has an equal chance to explain his or her viewpoint and concerns.
  2. Each parent listens to the other and tries to find realistic solutions.
  3. Each parent is asked to put the children first and focus on what the children need and can handle.
  4. Each parent is asked to show respect for the other and to recognize that their child has a right to a relationship with each of them.
  5. Hitting, pushing, shoving, and threats of any type are not allowed and considered domestic violence. Mediation is to be a safe place for both parents.

The mediator's job is to see that these rules are followed.

If There Has Been Domestic Violence

If you or a family member has any concerns about domestic violence, please do three things:

  1. Tell your lawyer if you have one.
  2. Answer all of the questions from the judge or mediation intake person about this problem.
  3. Talk to your mediator about this problem at the beginning of the mediation session.

KEEP IN MIND: The course of your session with the mediator can be determined by whether you have a domestic violence restraining order in effect and whether there has been a history of domestic violence between you and the other parent. In these cases, you have a right, subject to certain limitations, to have a support person with you during mediation and in the courtroom. You may also choose to see the mediator alone and at a different time from the other parent.

Also, if a mediator suspects any kind of child abuse, he or she is required by law to report it. Anyone who knowingly submits a false report of abuse is committing a crime. Ask your mediator for a list of community resources available to assist you and your children.

Visit our FAQ page for more information.

© 2017 Superior Court of Glenn County